Extreme Camouflage: Can You Find the Animal in the Photo?

Extreme Camouflage: Can You Find the Animal in the Photo?

Have you ever played Where’s Waldo? This is the ‘real-life’ animal version of that. In the wild, creatures have to adapt to their specific environment. Some animals develop striking patterns to intimidate predators. But other animals would rather blend into their environment. This effectively reduces the chances of their prey or predator from detecting them — even humans can’t easily spot them.

Find out how fast you can find the hidden animals below.

Oh deer

Our first entry is also known as chital, whose origin word means “spotted” — and that’s your first clue. Second, it has four legs and can weigh up to 165 pounds. Also, it’s looking at the camera.

Oh deer

You’ve guessed it: It’s the spotted deer. While it does have to fear its mighty predators, its white spots make it quite difficult to detect. Plus, its antlers can reach 3.3 feet long and help defend itself.

Legend of the goat milk drinker

Here’s a more difficult picture. This particular creature was found when the sun was out, but it’s actually more active at night. It eats flying insects, flies 20,000 kilometers annually, and there’s a misconception that it sucks milk from goats.

Legend of the goat milk drinker

The nighthawk is a nocturnal bird. It’s there at the foreground — resting on a boulder. It’s easier to look for this bird if you look for its tail, which isn’t shaped like all the surrounding rocks.

Tiger with wings

How about an easier pick? Like the giraffe, this creature seems to be looking right in front of the camera — and it’s unimpressed. Back in the days, researchers called it the “winged tiger” as it eats pretty much everything from rodents to armadillos and wild turkeys.

Tiger with wings

Yup, the great horned owl is not one to mess with. It’s the heaviest surviving owl species in the central and south regions of America, weighing up to 5.518 pounds.

Small chief

It looks like a rabbit or a hare, but it’s neither. However, this creature found in the mountains of North America did get the nickname “little chief hare” two centuries ago because of its small and oval body.

Small chief

The American pika is almost in the middle of the photo, a little to the right. Like the willow ptarmigan, the American pika changes in color in winter: Its fur turns grayer and more prominent.

According to height

How about an easier pick? Three of the same species are in this single photo, and they’re resting right next to one another. You could even say that they’ve arranged themselves by height.

According to height

Speaking of height, these birds lay their nests on cliff faces. The gyrfalcon is a bird of prey and it’s the biggest falcon species in the world. Female gyrfalcons are larger than their male counterparts. They eat fish, mammals, and other birds.

Tame something

Okay, here’s a pop culture clue: This mammal’s name forms the second word of an award-winning rock band. Some of its albums are Lonerism and Currents. Likewise, there are two subspecies of this familiar animal.

Tame something

You’ve guessed it right. The horned animal looking right in front of the camera is an impala, which lives in East Africa and South Africa. And while it isn’t endangered, the black-faced impala subspecies is a vulnerable species.

Not so common

This will likely take you more than a few seconds to figure out. Even we had to zoom in and out to find it. Ironically, this bird has “common” in its name. It can hide amongst ground foliage and it releases a sharp sound when surprised.

Not so common

The common sniper is in the lower-right area, you can see its brown and yellow body. On the other hand, its legs are a mix of green and grey.

Wile E

If this winter landscape was filled with snow, this animal wouldn’t be able to conceal itself. But thanks to the brown and green foliage, this popular (and adorable-looking) predator becomes hard to find.

Wile E

The coyote is standing a little to the left in the photo. During this cold season, coyotes eat carcasses and plant matter. It can hunt, but it’s better off scavenging in this weather. Outside of winter, it will feast on more rodents.

Tentacled Ditto

This one of the most intelligent and fascinating animals on Earth. If there’s an award for camouflaging, this would win. It can copy the look of other species. It’s like the real-life version of Ditto from Pokemon.

Tentacled Ditto

As the name implies, the mimic octopus can blend exceptionally well with its surroundings. It can copy the appearance of not only animals but also mere objects — and it’s the only known marine animal with this ability.

Living flower petal

Be careful when you pick flowers: Sometimes, a petal may not be a petal after all. Found in the tropical forests of Southeast Asia, this small carnivore eats flies, beetles, and even bees — and some are willing to eat its own kind.

Living flower petal

What you’re looking at is the Malaysian Orchid Mantis. It doesn’t need to find a white orchid to hide. For one, it can change to brown if it suits the flower petals better.

Not a crab

Do you have arachnophobia? Perhaps this kind of spider may change your mind. Not all spiders have to look terrifying or humongous. This one is comfortable with being small and staying on flower petals, just like the orchid mantis.

Not a crab

More than 2,100 species of crab spiders exist. The spiders got their name from how they resemble crabs. And it’s not just because of their looks: Like crabs, crab spiders usually raise their front legs like claws.

Proceed with caution

If you find this marine animal close to you, stay away — stay far away. It can live in shallow water and sandy areas, which is bad for beachgoers. And even with its gorgeous, jewel-like appearance, this is a dangerous fish.

Proceed with caution

The Pacific spotted scorpion supposedly has rich, delicious flesh. But fishermen won’t hunt these in huge quantities anytime soon: These fish have venomous spines. Thus, check the waters immediately if you feel a pinch or two on your feet.

Not so demonic

This is a photo of dry, crunchy leaves — or is it? This animal is found only in Madagascar. It lives in the tropical forests and lives in trees, eating insects at night. Without its camouflage, it won’t survive for long.

Not so demonic

Despite the name, the satanic leaf-tailed gecko isn’t the spawn of evil. Its other names include eyelash tailed-leaf gecko and phantastic leaf-tailed gecko. It has no eyelids, which allows it to clean its eyes with its long tongue.

Good old friend

This time, you’re looking for an animal that may have been man’s best friend before dogs came around. It’s associated with the full moon and it’s found in both Eurasia and North America. Also, it’s the largest surviving member of Canidae.

Good old friend

Otherwise known as the gray wolf, this animal has shorter ears than coyotes and jackals. The typical European wolf weighs 85 pounds on average, which is way heavier than the typical Indian wolf and Arabian wolf.

From Gotham City

Here’s another small critter that camouflages among small leaves. Still, this one is harmless. If it senses danger, it will hop away — and that’s a clue for you. Likewise, its body has a line at the center, which makes it distinguishable from the foliage.

From Gotham City

People call it the bat-faced toad, but we don’t blame others from disagreeing with the name. Maybe if it faced the camera, we can see if it does resemble the flying nocturnal animal or not.

Walking leaves

This next insect is found pretty much everywhere. You can spot them on all continents except Antarctica. Most live in tropical regions, with the Amazon rainforest alone being home to more than 2,000 species.

Walking leaves

This is the leaf katydid, also known as bush crickets or long-horned grasshoppers. Katydids range from 0.20 inches to 5.1 inches in length — and their antennae can grow longer than their own body length.

Chilling in a chilly area

Here’s another ferocious wild cat that needs protection from habitat destruction and illegal hunting. It lives in mountain ranges, which is perfect for its camouflage. For such a large animal, we don’t expect you to spot it instantly.

Chilling in a chilly area

You can only see its head at the left portion, but the snow leopard will make its presence felt when it needs to. Sadly, this is a vulnerable species that will likely decline more in numbers in the coming decades.

Spongebob’s enemy

Do you watch Spongebob Squarepants? One of the most iconic bad guys in that cartoon series is in this photo. In one particular episode, this marine animal bullied Spongebob. In real life, these are located at the ocean bottom.

Spongebob’s enemy

This is the righteye flounder. It got its name because it lies down on its left side — and its two eyes are both on the right. On the other hand, large-tooth flounders have their eyes on the left side.

A unique name

This bird undoubtedly has one of the cutest and most majestic names ever. It lives in tropical America and has a distinct and creepy nighttime growl. Likewise, it’s a nocturnal creature that eats beetles, bats, and the aforementioned katydids.

A unique name

The great potoo, which perfectly resembles the tree it’s perched at, has a relatively big head. In the day, the bird will stay on trees around 12 meters high. But at night, it will go down to about 1.5 meters off the ground.

Don’t pick this leaf

If you’re ever in India, Sri Lanka, or any country in Southeast Asia, look carefully before you touch a leaf. Otherwise, you may squash a tiny, innocent insect that just wants to metamorphose into its final form.

Don’t pick this leaf

The green thing you see at the center is the common baron caterpillar, which will eventually become a nymphalid butterfly. If you spot one, you can feed it mangoes and cashew apples — or leave it alone.

Nothing to see here

This is even a more difficult animal to find than the green caterpillar resting on a leaf with the same shade of green. If you told us no creature is in this photo, we would’ve believed you without hesitation.

Nothing to see here

So where is the flat-tailed gecko? Look at the right part, you’ll see one of its black eyes. Almost below that eye is its right frontal legs. Also, that twig-looking thing on the left is its tail.

On the lookout

Here’s an easier mystery to solve, especially because the photo focused on it. It has wings, is located in North America, and doesn’t go far away from where it was born, unlike other birds that migrate.

On the lookout

The bird on the right is the greater sage-grouse, which was previously known as just the sage grouse. Why did it change? In 2000, researchers confirmed that it was distinct from the Gunnison sage-grouse.

Fast and furious

If you’re a few meters away from this popular predator, your chances of survival are low. This animal can chase its prey as fast as possible — and it can do so in the blink of an eye.

Fast and furious

To be fair, the cheetah can’t do much about the outlines around its face. It’s a dead giveaway that the fastest predator on Earth is lurking. But if you don’t look at the foliage, you may not even notice.

A pretty pet

If you think you’ve found what we’re looking for, think again. It’s small and is found across South America, except in the dense Amazon rainforest. Likewise, its head is red right after birth but this eventually changes color.

A pretty pet

Did you look to the left? That’s the blue-crowned parakeet, also known as the blue-crowned conure. It’s largely green but has a blue head. It can reach 14.5 inches in length and is favored as pets.

Florida may have one

This is one of the reasons why we don’t like getting in the water — or on a small, wooden boat. A bite from this prehistoric-looking monster may shred you to bits. However, this isn’t an alligator nor is it a crocodile.

Florida may have one

The only bit you can see here is the caiman’s eye to the left, looking for prey to pounce. Some think it’s an alligator, but the caiman has a longer and leaner set of teeth.

Fancy big cat

This mighty feline isn’t as fast as the cheetah — its legs are shorter than other wild cats. But you still won’t want this to catch you. It is a “vulnerable” species because of illegal hunting and habitat loss.

Fancy big cat

The leopard doesn’t have typical spots. The markings you see are called “rosettes”, which are quite the same to those you’d find on a jaguar. The difference is that a leopard’s rosettes are smaller and denser.

Mr. Long Neck

If you’ve seen Madagascar, you’ll know which direction to look. And with all the chaotic, twisting foliage, you may not see what’s right in front. On the other hand, this animal is looking right at the camera.

Mr. Long Neck

You’ve guessed it: It’s a giraffe. As the tallest animal on land (thanks to its superior neck and legs), the giraffe can reach a speed of 37 mph and stay at about 31 mph for long distances.

Horror underneath sand

No, you’re not looking at a huge assortment of brownish-orange beads. There is something lurker under the sand, but you’re better off having it stay there. Its strike could land you in the hospital, causing shock, nausea, and even necrotic ulcer.

Horror underneath sand

So what is it? This is the horned adder — a venomous viper that lives in the deserts of southwest Africa. As the name implies, it has two scales above its eyes that resemble horns.

Roaming in winter

Winter is a good season for camouflage. Most trees and surfaces are blanketed in snow, which means that white animals can go about undetected — and this bird is free to roam around in the tundras of Alaska and Siberia, among others.

Roaming in winter

If you look closely, the willow ptarmigan’s black eyes and beak are there. But don’t expect this bird to stay white all year long: It goes back to a brownish color in the summer.

The softest stone

How about another bird? But instead of hiding around the bush, this one prefers to stay among rocks it shares its color with. You may spot it in Alaska or Canada, but it’s also been seen in Russia and Australia.

The softest stone

The wandering tattler is a medium-sized bird sporting gray colors at the top and white on its belly, but this particular one is still a baby, with its mother likely nearby and preparing its food.

Suspicious tree

Do you sometimes feel like something is out there behind the trees when you’re hiking, just looking at you? Perhaps that’s not a ghost or any paranormal entity. Instead, it may just be an observant owl.

Suspicious tree

The great gray owl is a huge bird, so much so that it’s the largest owl species in terms of length. An adult great gray owl can reach up to 33 inches in length and have a wingspan of over five feet.

In plain sight

This is undoubtedly one of the most difficult animals to find in its habitat. This sea creature matches this particular soft coral so well in color, size, and shape.

In plain sight

What you’re seeing is the pygmy seahorse, which was only discovered when its host coral was examined in a lab. The only things giving it away are how it’s coiled to the coral and how its pores look different.

Resting from flight

Under the blazing heat of the sun, a bird rests on the ground. You can see it quickly if it was around the foliage, but it’s surrounded by all sorts of rocks. If you were far away, you wouldn’t even notice it.

Resting from flight

This relatively small bird lives in the US and the tropical regions of South America. It’s called the lesser nighthawk, and it got its name because it’s like the common nighthawk, but smaller.

Paying attention

Even if you see this mammal, you’ll find it hard to recall its exact name. Also, this small, nocturnal, and monogamous creature is the only member of its genus — but it’s far from a threatened species.

Paying attention

This is the klipspringer, which lives in rocky areas. You should probably take a second look at the photo. Two antelopes are in it, with the second one a little further behind on the right.

Don’t step on it

If you’re wondering, yes, birds are pretty great at camouflage. This medium-sized bird is found in Russia, Canada, and even Africa, among other regions. They like to travel in massive flocks but only if it’s not yet breeding season.

Don’t step on it

This is the red knot, which is a shorebird that was first characterized in the 18th century. It likes to stay in shorelines and mudflats, and some believe it got its name from the grunting sound it makes.

Walking stick

We just spoiled the name of the animal for you, but it’s still hard to believe that such a creature exists. Imagine a kid grabbing this “stick” to play with, and then sensing it crawling around his back.

Walking stick

Otherwise known as the bug stick, the walking stick thrives in both tropical and subtropical regions. It only eats plants, so it doesn’t attract much attention since it’s fine staying in tree canopies.

Predator at rest

Photos sometimes make us think that animals are way too easy to spot. For one, this frightening cat is big and heavy. Yet if it wasn’t at the center, you’d understand why its prey doesn’t always see it in time.

Predator at rest

The Bengal tiger is the national animal of two nations: Bangladesh and India. Around 3,000 Bengal tigers exist, which is an improvement over the previous years and a testament to the success of conservation efforts.

A hint of blue

If it was an adult male, it would be way easier to locate because it would have a largely blue body with black portions. But the bird here is either young or an adult female, which makes it mostly green instead.

A hint of blue

The blue dacnis or the turquoise honeycreeper is found in the forests and woodlands of South America. It only weighs around 13 grams, but it can swallow small fruits whole.

Almost pure white

If this adorable little animal was lying down on all fours, it would be more difficult to see. But since it’s standing upright, you can see its eyes and ears easier. Still, isn’t its snow-white fur coat amazing?

Almost pure white

Otherwise called the short-tailed weasel, the stoat doesn’t always sport a white coat. In other seasons, its coat is more a mixture of yellow and brown — and it was once used to make capes.

Many-legged flower

Usually, we hate spiders, but this one is too small to be frightening. If we saw it imitating the goldenrod flower, we would be amused — it’s like it wants to be an eight-legged ballet performer.

Many-legged flower

The goldenrod crab spider or the banana spider isn’t always yellow. Sometimes, it will turn white if it will hunt on a white flower, and back to yellow if it goes back to a goldenrod flower.

Not a coral reef

Okay, this isn’t a seahorse, despite how it can hide among coral reefs — just like the pygmy seahorse. It’s found in the Indo-Pacific region, has a downward-facing mouth, and doesn’t exceed 5.9 inches in length.

Not a coral reef

The ghost pipefish or the tubemouth fish has a peculiar way of eating crustaceans: It sucks them in with its snout. You can find them in open waters, but finding them around reefs is hard since it can change shape and color.

Salt and ?

If you saw an insect with white wings and bits of black, what would you call it? While you may think this is an easy find, we had to zoom in to capture this. Normally, people won’t notice such a small creature.

Salt and

Amusingly enough, it’s called the peppered moth. But even in its caterpillar form, this creature already excels at camouflage: It copies the color and form of a twig.

Jumping at random

Don’t worry, the sand isn’t hiding a venomous viper this time — it’s much smaller and actually has legs. It can’t navigate well since it can’t control its direction, but that doesn’t stop it from hopping around.

Jumping at random

The sandhopper doesn’t live in the desert sand. Instead, it’s found along the coast. Like some of the animals on our list, it rests during the day and eats at night, eating decomposing seaweed.

Another flatfish

We’re not done with flounders. Unlike the right-eye flounder, this isn’t found at the ocean bottom. In contrast, this stays on sandy bottoms close to the shore — although some have been found more than 1,000 feet from the shore.

Another flatfish

These flounders reproduce fast and aren’t threatened by fishing. The speckled sanddab does a good job of imitating the surrounding surface. However, it has a load of predators ranging from birds to marine mammals.

Greatest fear

Finally, we have something most people would rather not have around. The mere thought of having this jump on your face could easily trigger one’s fears. Also, it’s one of the reasons why some people don’t want to be in Queensland, Australia.

Greatest fear

This eight-legged freak is called the lichen huntsman spider. It comes in many colors and color forms, but the hunting style remains the same: hide among foliage and strike when the prey is near.